Happy Saint Patrick’s Day

Saint Patrick was born at Kilpatrick, near Dumbarton, in Scotland, in the year 387 and  died at Saul, Downpatrick, Ireland, 17 March, 461.

As a young man he was captured and endured years of slavery to an Irish Chieftan called Milchu in what is now County Antrim. After a reputedly miraculous escape he returned to his home in Scotland and entered the Church. He was ordained as a priest by St. Germanis, the Bishop of Auxerre. After years of missionary work in  Northern Europe and Britain, Patrick,  was sent after visiting the Pope in Rome, St Celestine, to take the Gospel to Ireland. During his long overland return journey he was ordained  as a Bishop by Bishop St Maximus in Turin.

Patrick arrived in Ireland in 433. He met and eventually converted an initially hostile chieftain of one of the tribes, Dichu. At Slane Hill and then Tara on Easter Sunday 433 he was granted permission to preach the gospels to the Irish people by the Supreme King of Ireland,  Leoghaire. He spent his life converting the people of Ireland and building many churches. It is also said that he banished snakes from Ireland. (There are none there to this day, except in zoos)


It was recorded at the time that the ‘Shamrock’ a plant which is native to Ireland was used by Patrick  to explain the Holy Trinity, ( Father, Son and Holy Ghost) and has been associated with him and the Irish since that time.

Mick

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About Councillor, Sefton MBC

Councillor, Sefton Metropolitan Borough Council, Victoria Ward, Ward Chair'
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